Science Workshop: Ryan Johnson (Bennington ’06)

Catalyzing CO Oxidation; from Surfaces to Single Atoms

CO ox

Model for CO Oxidation, from Peterson et al, Nat. Commun. 5:4885 (2014)

Please join us Friday, September 26th for a special Science Workshop with Bennington alum Ryan Johnson (’06). Ryan received his Ph. D. in Chemistry from the University of New Mexico earlier this year, culminating an exceptionally productive graduate career; he co-authored seven research articles in 2014 alone (so far) in journals such as The Journal of Physical ChemistryThe Chemistry of Materials, and Theoretical Chemistry Accounts.

ryan johnson

Ryan Johnson on the Bennington College campus, December 2013.

His thesis work on computational studies of catalytic processes will be the main focus of his talk. For those wanting to read about some of his research, Ryan just published (on Sept. 15) a paper in Nature Communications entitled, “Low-temperature carbon monoxide oxidation catalysed by regenerable atomically dispersed palladium on alumina”, available here . He will discuss the research and its larger significance, and promises to add some personal insights concerning his choice of pursuing science as an adventure.

Don’t miss it.

 

Science Workshop Friday September 12 – Olivine carbonation and climate change

On Friday September 12 Tim Schroeder will present a part of the research that he did while on sabbatical at the University of Bremen, Germany.

Olivine is the most abundant mineral in Earth’s upper mantle. When it is exposed at Earth’s surface by faulting, it tends to be oxidized to form a number of different possible mineral species that are more stable near Earth’s surface. One possible chain of reactions consumes carbon-dioxide to form solid carbonate minerals. It may be possible to harness this reaction path to absorb much of Earth’s excess atmospheric carbon. Tim studied carbonate minerals formed during hydrothermal circulation through olivine-bearing oceanic crust in order to understand this process.

Calcite_replacement_pic

This image was taken through a polarizing light microscope. It shows small cores of olivine (Ol) grains that have mostly been replaced by talc (Tlc) and calcite (Cal). Other minerals are present in the rock, including clinopyroxene (cpx) veins of celadonite (Cel)

 

Welcome and Welcome Back

Campus seems to have changed overnight from the quiet that is life on campus in the summer to the constant activity that marks the start of term. It has been wonderful to welcome so many first year students who are excited about science, math and computing and to welcome back all of our returning students. We hope that all of you had enjoyable and productive summers and are ready to engage in all of the upcoming challenges that we delight in creating for you, as well as those you create for yourselves. We wanted to help you start the year off by sharing some news, information, and announcements you may find useful. Continue reading