Science Workshop: Microtubule-based Motor Proteins

Have you ever wondered how cellular cargo gets transported from place to place along cytoskeletal networks? How vesicles travel down looooooooooooooong nerve axons to reach their destinations? How force is generated on spindle microtubules to permit chromosome movement during mitosis and meiosis? Would you be surprised to learn that “two-headed monsters” are involved???

Well, two-headed molecular motor proteins, at the least! Come hear Dr. Susan Gilbert, Professor and Head of the Department of Biological Sciences at RPI, talk at science workshop about her ongoing research on the Kinesin family of microtubule-based motor proteins.

kinesin

 

Science Workshop: Using Crystal Age and Compositions to Understand How Volcanoes Come Back to Life

Science Workshop:  November 7, 2014.  1 PM.  Dickinson 232.

This Friday’s Science Workshop speaker is Erik Klemetti, Assistant Professor of Geosciences at Denison University, and author of the popular Eruptions blog at Wired.

ChaosCragsHis talk, “Using Crystal Age and Compositions to Understand How Volcanoes Come Back to Life” is described as follows:

Volcanoes spend most of their existence not erupting. This doesn’t mean that there aren’t a multitude of magmatic processes going on underneath. These might include intrusions of new magma, crystallization of existing magma, magma mixing and movement of crystals through the “crystal mush” that sits under the volcano. These processes all leave their compositional and temporal signature on the crystals that form and are subsequently incorporated into the magma that does erupt. I will discuss how examination of zircon crystals in magma can help us unravel the timing and nature of events that occur between volcanic eruptions with a focus on the evolution of the Lassen Volcanic Center in California. Overall, current trace element and U-Th disequilibria age data derived from zircon suggests that an otherwise moribund magmatic system can be brought back to life (rejuvenated) by new intrusions of magmatic that are geologically ephemeral, lasting years to millennia. This conclusion means that the events that lead to the 1915 eruption at Lassen Peak unfolded rapidly before the explosive eruption, the only to occur in California in the last century.